UC Davis Selects Global Plant Genetics, Ltd. for Strawberry Licensing in Europe, Mediterranean and South America

UC Davis Selects Global Plant Genetics, Ltd. for Strawberry Licensing in Europe, Mediterranean and South America

Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiatives Enabled by AB 2664 Funding Show Impact

Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiatives Enabled by AB 2664 Funding Show Impact

Record Number of UC Davis Startups for 2017–18

Record Number of UC Davis Startups for 2017–18

ASF and UC Davis collaborating to unlock new potential in human milk oligosaccharides

BASF and UC Davis collaborating to unlock new potential in human milk oligosaccharides

BASF and UC Davis collaborating to unlock new potential in human milk oligosaccharides

ASF and UC Davis collaborating to unlock new potential in human milk oligosaccharides

Top left to right: Marianne Heer (BASF), Anita Oberbauer (UC Davis), David Mills (UC Davis), Yan Qin (BASF), Helen Raybould (UC Davis), Daniela Barile (UC Davis), Yoram Barak (BASF), Bruce German (UC Davis), Xi Chen (UC Davis)
Lower left to right: Prasant Mohapatra (UC Davis), Benjamin Knudsen (BASF), Ahmad Hakim-Elahi (UC Davis), Stefan Rüdenauer (BASF), Dushyant Pathak (UC Davis)

The University of California, Davis (UC Davis), and BASF announced a collaboration to unlock new benefits of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). The long-term objective of this strategic research partnership is to develop and validate second-generation HMO molecules as potent bioactive compounds that can influence the establishment and maintenance of the gut microbiome and provide benefits beyond the gastrointestinal tract, such as brain health, for infants, children and adults.

Human milk contains a multitude of HMOs, a class of indigestible carbohydrates that is gaining recognition for a variety of health-promoting activities. Substantial evidence demonstrates that the high diversity of structures and concentration of HMOs in human milk contribute to improved health outcomes associated with breastfeeding.

“This collaboration is an essential cornerstone of our strategic initiative to become a leading science-based player in the fields of HMO and microbiome,” said Stefan Rüdenauer, director of Development and Scientific Marketing Human Nutrition at BASF.

The two-year partnership with UC Davis’ research team is part of BASF’s California Research Alliance (CARA), which brings together experts from major universities on the West Coast to collaborate on new materials and their applications, biosciences and related technologies.

“We are pleased to see this expansion to our existing collaborative engagement with BASF via the CARA network,” said Dushyant Pathak, associate vice chancellor for Technology Management & Corporate Relations in the UC Davis Office of Research. “BASF’s commitment to supporting innovation at UC Davis is resulting in direct benefit to our faculty researchers, to the company, to the region and to society at large through helping us realize societal benefit from cutting-edge university research.”

Professors Daniela Barile, David Mills, Helen Raybould, Xi Chen, and Bruce German from the Foods for Health Institute at UC Davis will use their collective expertise to reveal new applications for HMOs. BASF’s contributions to the partnership include its proficiency in fermentation products and the development of human nutrition solutions, as well as project funding.

“We are excited to partner with BASF to unlock novel HMO functionalities,” said Professor Barile. “This project will employ a range of microbiological and physiological studies employing cutting-edge glycomics and metagenomics tools to explore how HMOs interact with the human host and the microbes within them.”

About BASF

BASF Corporation, headquartered in Florham Park, New Jersey, is the North American affiliate of BASF SE, Ludwigshafen, Germany. BASF has more than 18,200 employees in North America, and had sales of $17.9 billion in 2017. For more information about BASF’s North American operations, visit www.basf.com.

About CARA

The California Research Alliance (CARA) is one of four BASF scientific excellence clusters that collaborate with research groups on a regional level, maintaining a network between BASF, the campuses of the University of California system, Stanford and Caltech. The researchers at CARA work in a variety of scientific disciplines including new materials, biosciences, formulations, and catalysis, as well as computational and engineering disciplines.

The CARA collaboration, started in 2014 with 10 postdoctoral positions, has been extended to approximately 50 postdoctoral positions today. CARA researchers have filed 10 patents, and have had more than 20 peer-reviewed papers accepted or published. In addition, the first research projects have already been transferred to BASF R&D for further development. Peidong Yang, CARA co-director and professor of chemistry at UC Berkeley, said, “With this newest collaboration, we now have multiple CARA research projects active between BASF, the UC campuses, Stanford, and Caltech. The broad research expertise represented by this vibrant West Coast scientific community will surely expedite the discovery process for many scientific and technological questions.”

 

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Bifidobacteria Supplement Colonizes Gut of Breastfed Infants

Bifidobacteria Supplement Colonizes Gut of Breastfed Infants

UC Davis Signs Subscription Agreement with Intel

UC Davis and Intel Sign Subscription Agreement for Current and Future University Patents

circuit board

Agreement provides Intel with the right to enter into non-exclusive licenses for certain patents managed by UC Davis.

UC Davis and Intel Corporation (“Intel”) have signed a subscription agreement covering certain UC Davis patents.  Intel has an option to non-exclusively license patents covered by the agreement during a specified period of time and at a predetermined fee.  UC Davis retains the right to license these patents to other parties - either non-exclusively in any field of use or exclusively outside the defined field of use.  This agreement continues for five years, with successive five-year extensions subject to mutual agreement by Intel and UC Davis.

“Initiating this subscription agreement further extends opportunities for Intel to benefit from UC Davis’ world-class innovation in engineering and computer science,” said Dr. Dushyant Pathak, Associate Vice Chancellor for Technology Management & Corporate Relations and Executive Director of Venture Catalyst within the UC Davis Office of Research, “Our new agreement continues an already successful relationship between Intel and UC Davis, and we look forward to this as a springboard for further collaboration,” he added.

About UC Davis InnovationAccess

InnovationAccess is one of three units within the Technology Management & Corporate Relations division of UC Davis.  It actively manages a portfolio of more than 1,300 inventions reflecting the diversity of the campus’ research and technology innovation, and seeks opportunities to commercialize these via licensing, with more than 700 active licenses.  In addition to negotiating licenses with established companies, InnovationAccess also supports licensing to enable startup companies emerging from university research. 14 startup companies were enabled with foundational IP from the university during FY 2016-17 and over 90 start-up companies formed since 2005.  The UC Davis InnovationAccess team comprises more than 20 intellectual property professionals with PhDs, JDs, MBAs and substantial private-sector experience.

About Intel

Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) expands the boundaries of technology to make the most amazing experiences possible.  Information about Intel can be found at newsroom.intel.com and intel.com.

 

Posted on June 1, 2017

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Innovation Awards 2018

UC Davis Innovators Honored for Contributions in Agriculture, Pathology

UC Davis Innovators Honored for Contributions in Agriculture, Pathology

UC Davis Innovators Honored for Contributions in Agriculture, Pathology

The University of California, Davis, tonight (May 15) announced the recipients of the university’s 2018 Chancellor’s Innovation Awards at a ceremony on campus. Established in 2016, the awards recognize faculty, community partners and industry leaders for their work, dedication and success in improving the lives of others and addressing the needs of our global society either through innovations in technology or innovative societal engagement.

“These honorees reflect the growing importance of UC Davis as an incubator and promoter of innovation, not just in the Sacramento region, but in the world,” said Provost Ralph J. Hexter. “They are groundbreakers in finding new ways to feed the world, build community and develop technology that creates a better tomorrow for all.”

The university’s Venture Catalyst team manages the Chancellor’s Innovation Awards as part of its broader mission to enable innovative students, faculty and staff to engage effectively with the innovation community both within and outside the university. “Recognizing our campus innovators and celebrating how their research and innovative university activities positively impact society is one of the ways in which we are supporting a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship at UC Davis,” said Dushyant Pathak, associate vice chancellor of research and the executive director of Venture Catalyst within the UC Davis Office of Research.

Innovators of the Year

These awards recognize individual faculty, staff or teams whose innovative research or accomplishments have made a measurable societal impact in the preceding year, or whose university activities have achieved important milestones, and present very strong potential for societal impact. Recipients receive $10,000 that can be applied to their research or to university enabled societal engagement efforts. This year’s recipients are the DryCard team from the Horticulture Innovation Lab and Richard Levenson, professor and vice chair for strategic technologies in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.

DryCard team

The DryCard team from the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture in the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences was selected for its simple, low-cost invention that helps prevent food spoilage. The reusable DryCard™ is about the size of a business card and uses a strip of cobalt chloride paper that changes color based on humidity. Instructions (available in multiple languages) are printed directly on the card. With a DryCard and an airtight container, farmers can test samples of their crops for dryness in 20 to 30 minutes. Crops that are stored before being sufficiently dry are susceptible to molds and dangerous aflatoxins. Mold growth on dried foods is a pervasive problem in developing countries, leading to food waste and foods that are unsafe for consumption.

Video: A inexpensive innovation to prevent food waste

The DryCard team from the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Horticulture in the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences was selected for its simple, low-cost invention that helps prevent food spoilage. The reusable DryCard™ is about the size of a business card and uses a strip of cobalt chloride paper that changes color based on humidity. Instructions (available in multiple languages) are printed directly on the card. With a DryCard and an airtight container, farmers can test samples of their crops for dryness in 20 to 30 minutes. Crops that are stored before being sufficiently dry are susceptible to molds and dangerous aflatoxins. Mold growth on dried foods is a pervasive problem in developing countries, leading to food waste and foods that are unsafe for consumption.

The DryCard team includes: Elizabeth Mitcham, director; James Thompson, postharvest specialist emeritus; Michael Reid, leader for innovation and technology; Angelos Deltsidis, international postharvest specialist; Archie Jarman, program officer; Anthony Phan, staff analyst; and Brenda Dawson, communications coordinator.

The idea for the card came from Reid and Thompson, who have a history of working together in California and around the world on postharvest technologies to reduce crop losses. Last year the card was named as the top emerging technology for reducing food loss and waste across the African continent at the All-Africa Postharvest Congress and Exhibition in Kenya. Through the Horticulture Innovation Lab, the team has collaborated with a network of independent businesses in Africa and Asia that have manufactured and distributed more than 10,000 DryCards. Helping local entrepreneurs manufacture the cards inexpensively but for profit is the team’s strategy for helping spread the product throughout the developing world.

The Horticulture Innovation Lab is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, as part of the U.S. government’s global hunger and food security initiative called Feed the Future.

Richard Levenson

Levenson, professor and vice chair for strategic technologies in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the UC Davis School of Medicine, has been selected Innovator of the Year for the development of Microscopy with Ultraviolet Surface Excitation, or MUSE, to obtain high-resolution images of biological tissue specimens without first requiring the time-consuming preparation of thin sections mounted on glass slides.

Video: Richard Levenson on MUSE microscopy

The technology, based on intellectual property jointly developed at Lawrence Livermore National Lab and UC Davis, uses ultraviolet light to penetrate the surface of tissue samples to a depth of a few microns, about the same thickness of tissue slices on traditional microscope slides. The result is a detailed, diagnostic-quality image in minutes instead of the many hours that traditional methods require. MUSE has the potential to transform the practice of pathology, especially in low-resource settings, and to have a major global impact in health care by greatly reducing the cost and time to deliver definitive diagnostic results. The ability to obtain such nearly instant, high-resolution, full-color images can also be a valuable tool for researchers who want to get tissue-based insights at the laboratory bench. Levenson is the co-founder of MUSE Microscopy Inc., which is working to commercialize the technology.

Lifetime Achievement Award for Innovation

Gurdev Khush, a world-renowned plant geneticist, is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award for Innovation for his truly extraordinary leadership in developing rice strains that have enhanced the quality and quantity of global rice supplies. The award recognizes an acknowledged innovator whose career accomplishments include innovations that have led to a long-term positive impact on the lives of others and who is an inspiring influence for other innovators.

Gurdev Khush

Gurdev Khush, a world-renowned plant geneticist, is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award for Innovation. (Credit: International Rice Research Institute)

Khush is known one of the heroes of the Green Revolution, a movement that sought to significantly increase agricultural yields, particularly in developing countries.

Khush earned a B.Sc. from Punjab Agricultural University in India and a Ph.D. from UC Davis. He played a key role in the development of more than 300 innovative rice varieties. One of these, IR36, is the most widely planted food crop ever grown. He spent over 30 years at the International Rice Research Institute, or IRRI, directing and participating in both genetic research and the delivery of rice varieties to underserved populations around the globe.

Owing in large part to Khush’s contribution, world rice production increased from 257 million tons in 1966 to 718 million tons in 2011. Khush has won numerous international awards and has received honorary doctorates and degrees from multiple universities. After he retired from IRRI in 2002, Khush returned to UC Davis as an adjunct professor of plant sciences. Khush is also the recipient of the 2018 UC Davis Medal, given to those who have made exceptional and sustained contributions to the UC Davis community and beyond.

Innovative Community Partner Award

Seed Central is the recipient of the UC Davis Chancellor’s Innovative Community Partner of the Year Award, given in recognition of significant contributions to driving regional economic impact through innovation, entrepreneurship or support for growing the startup ecosystem in collaboration with university.

Francois Korn, managing director of Seed Central, and Kent Bradford, distinguished professor of plant sciences and director of the Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis. Seed Central is the recipient of the UC Davis Chancellor’s Innovative Community Partner of the Year Award. (Credit: AJ Cheline, UC Davis)

Francois Korn, managing director of Seed Central, and Kent Bradford, distinguished professor of plant sciences and director of the Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis. Seed Central is the recipient of the UC Davis Chancellor’s Innovative Community Partner of the Year Award. (Credit: AJ Cheline, UC Davis)

Seed Central energizes the seed and ag-biotech industry around UC Davis and contributes to economic development in the region. The public-private partnership was co-founded in 2010 by Francois Korn, managing director, and Kent Bradford, distinguished professor of plant sciences and director of the Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis. The innovative partnership facilitates communication and research collaboration between campus and industry in order to bring science to market faster. Seed Central connects campus scientists and students with industry researchers and managers at monthly networking events and encourages and helps industry sponsor research on campus. Seed Central also connects students with industry through frequent networking opportunities, field trips, shadowing experiences, internships, career development workshops and special events centered on outreach to women in STEM fields.

Media contact(s)

AJ Cheline, UC Davis Office of Research, 530-752-1101, acheline@ucdavis.edu

2018 Chancellor’s Innovation Awards Nominees

Ramsey Badawi, Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering; Simon Cherry, Distinguished Professor, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
The world's first total-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner.

John Boone, Professor, Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
Breast CT system that is capable of generating 300 to 500 tomographic slices of the breast using the same radiation levels as two view mammography.

Robert Brosnan, Professor of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine
Discovery and development of a new inhaled general anesthetics, which led to the discovery of a novel analgesic.

Gino Cortopassi, Professor, Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine
Advanced the understanding of mitochondrial disorders, neuro-degeneration in humans and animals, as well as an understanding of diabetes and metabolic disorders.

Paul Feldstein, President and CEO at Circularis Biotech
Unique ribozyme design that is capable of discovering all active promoters in an organisms’ genome so that they can be analyzed and then evolved for enhanced performance.

Allen Gao, Ralph de Vere White Professor, Urology, School of Medicine
Prostate cancer therapies with special focus on cases of intractable cancers that become resistant to standard treatments.

Bruce Hammock, Distinguished Professor, Entomology and Nematology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
Inhibitors of the sEH enzyme which degrades natural mediators, thereby reducing hypertension, inflammation, and pain.

David Horsley, Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering
Miniature sonar sensor by combining microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) ultrasound transducers and ultralow-power integrated circuits in a tiny, millimeter-scale package.

Tina Jeoh, Associate Professor, Biological and Agricultural Engineering; Herbert Scher, Research Engineer; Scott Strobel, Ph.D. Candidate; Yuting Tang, Ph.D. Student; College of Engineering.
An inexpensive and effective method for encapsulation of chemicals or biologics in stable, identifiable capsules that enhance the stability and control the release of their encapsulants.

Austin Johnson, Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine; School of Medicine; Jason Adams, Assistant Professor, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; School of Medicine
VentRight uses advanced sensors and waveform analytics to optimize ventilation for patients with acute respiratory failure. Endovascular Perfusion Augmentation for Critical Care (EPACC) represents a device that optimizes blood pressure management during shock using automated dynamic control of an intra-aortic balloon-tipped catheter.

Samuel Louie, Professor of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine
The ROAD (Reversible Obstructive Airways Disease) Project addresses healthcare disparities and unmet needs in patient education and safety for the COPD population captured by UC Davis Health.

Mark Mascal, Professor, Chemistry, College of Letters and Sciences
Processing waste biomass to produce plastics and bio-based fuels.

Prasant Mohapatra, Professor, Computer Science, College of Engineering
Computer networks with specializations in Wireless Networks, Mobile Communications and Systems, Cybersecurity, Wireless Performance, Quality and Security, and Network Analytics.

Jan Nolta, Professor, Institute for Regenerative Cures, School of Medicine
Cellular response to hypoxia and chemokines, cell motility, cell-to-cell interactions, and paracrine factors secreted by MSCs at the site of injury.

Hooman Rashidi, Associate Professor, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine
An advanced app focused on hematology assessment.

Michael Rogawski, Professor, Neurology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine
The first bench-to-beside translation for a therapeutic in postpartum depression.

Michael Siminovitch, Director, California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC)
Shifting of the paradigm in lighting and technology science from a sole focus on energy efficiency to a more complex understanding of the interplay among energy efficiency and quality, human health and well-being, and aesthetics.

Neelima Sinha, Professor, Plant Biology, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences; Brad Townsley, CEO & Co-Founder of Amaryllis Nucleics; Mike Covington, CTO & Co-Founder of Amaryllis Nucleics
Technology for synthesizing, sequencing, and analyzing RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries.

Gang Sun, Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering
Sensitive, wearable, disposable, color changing sensor, to rapidly detect the presence of fumigants.

Garen Wintemute, Attending Physician, Emergency Department, School of Medicine
Firearm safety and gun violence prevention research.

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Bayer Collaborates with UC Davis Venture Catalyst to Support Regional Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Bayer Collaborates with UC Davis Venture Catalyst to Support Regional Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Bayer Collaborates with UC Davis Venture Catalyst to Support Regional Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Bayer Collaborates with UC Davis Venture Catalyst to Support Regional Innovation and Entrepreneurship

The University of California, Davis announced today a strategic collaboration agreement with Bayer Crop Science to foster innovation and economic development in the Sacramento region by providing dedicated facility support for university-affiliated startups — particularly those in the areas of agriculture and food-related technologies. 

Located within Bayer’s West Sacramento Innovation Hub for Crop Science, the 3,000 square-foot CoLaborator is designed to house and foster innovative new ventures to transform modern agriculture.  It consists of a flexible floor plan that has the capacity for eight to ten researchers and provides basic equipment for agtech startups to quickly begin putting their ideas to the test.  San Francisco-bred Biome Makers, Inc., a rising startup in the field of microbiomes, is the CoLaborator’s first tenant and chose West Sacramento over the Bay Area as their headquarters

“Working with Bayer provides our campus entrepreneurs with another tremendous resource and further strengthens the growing regional innovation ecosystem,” said Dushyant Pathak, associate vice chancellor of Research and executive director of Venture Catalyst at UC Davis. “The value of this effort extends much further than addressing the need for appropriate facilities, it creates an opportunity for entrepreneurs to engage with other experts in and outside their field and build relationships critical for their success.”

As part of the agreement, Bayer joins the university’s Distributed Research Incubation and Venture Engine (DRIVETM) network of startup incubators. The DRIVE network is part of a platform of resources offered by UC Davis Venture Catalyst to support the successful translation of research and new technologies emerging from the university into new commercial ventures. Venture Catalyst is part of the Technology Management and Corporate Relations division of the UC Davis Office of Research.

“We are thrilled to be working with the University of California, Davis to help grow new ventures with the possibility to transform modern agriculture,” said Jon Margolis, Head of Research and Technologies BLX.  “While we at Bayer are proud of the advances in our own laboratories, we recognize that the challenges today’s growers face will require an open innovation strategy that taps into the larger scientific community.”

About UC Davis

UC Davis is a global community of individuals united to better humanity and our natural world while seeking solutions to some of our most pressing challenges. Located near the California state capital, UC Davis has more than 35,000 students, an annual research budget of over $780 million and a comprehensive health system. The university offers 102 undergraduate majors and 99 graduate programs through four colleges and six professional schools.

About Venture Catalyst

Venture Catalyst is one of three units within the Technology Management and Corporate Relations division of the UC Davis Office of Research. Venture Catalyst furthers the university’s educational, research and public mission by supporting UC Davis students, faculty and researchers in translating science, engineering and innovative research, through well-resourced startups, into societal impact.

About Bayer

Bayer is a global enterprise with core competencies in the Life Science fields of health care and agriculture. Its products and services are designed to benefit people and improve their quality of life. At the same time, the Group aims to create value through innovation, growth and high earning power. Bayer is committed to the principles of sustainable development and to its social and ethical responsibilities as a corporate citizen. In fiscal 2017, the Group employed around 99,800 people and had sales of EUR 35.0 billion. Capital expenditures amounted to EUR 2.4 billion, R&D expenses to EUR 4.5 billion. For more information, go to www.bayer.com.

 

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